WORLD WAR I
AND THE FIRST WORLD WAR

 

World War I was the first world war that was fought over the world between the nations that made war upon the other warring nations of the world worldwide. This global war lasted for four years and in that time the world saw four years of warfare between the years 1914-1918, which is the number of years it took for the completion of the first world war.

The war was not called World War I when it was fought since there had been no plan for World War II at the time World War I was fought, which wasn’t referred to as World War I until World War II was in full swing.

World War I was fought between two sides who fought in the first world war ferociously against each other, which hammered a wedge between the two sides that fought one another. This style of choosing sides and allies continued into the second world war, which bears a resemblance to the first world war, especially when considering that both wars started once two opposing sides were established.

The two opposing sides in World War I were the Central Powers, who fought against the Allied Powers in the first world war, and the Allied Power, whose only enemy was the Central Powers. These two sides continued to fight against each other for the duration of the first world war.

The Central Powers were such called because of their central position in Europe, the continent on which much of World War I (as well as World War II, which came after World War I) was fought between the Allied Powers and the Central Powers in Europe. The Central Powers consisted of Germany, which was allied with Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire (located by the Mediterranean Sea, which lies directly south of Europe, the continent that hosted both world wars.

The Allied Powers were called that because they had allied themselves together against the Central Power to fight against in the first world war, in which the Allied Powers and the Central Powers found themselves at odds with each other on the continent of Europe. The Allied Powers consisted of England, who allied herself with France, Russia, Italy, Belgium and later the United States; France who was allied with England, Russia, Italy, Belgium and later the United States; Russia, who had friendly relations with England, France, Italy, Belgium and later the United States; Italy, which fought on the same side as England, France, Russia, Belgium and later the United States; Belgium, who supplemented the efforts of England, France, Russia, Italy, and later the United States; and later, the United States, who served with the Allied Powers in World War I, along with England France, Russia, Italy and Belgium. Many other countries joined the war later, none of which were as important as those who were important enough upon joining the war to deserve mention in the above listing which includes the important participants in Europe’s first world war.

The first world war began in the year 1914, which is the same year in which World War I broke out across Europe. Much of this war was fought with trench combat, in which opposing armies who were fighting on opposite sides in World War I would face each other in parallel trenches that ran for miles over the continent of Europe. Opposing armies faced each other in a military showdown known as trench warfare with the aforementioned trenches lying between the enemies’ territory.

The war was fought militaristically with weapons that the nations used upon the other nations that were fighting in the first world war against their enemies. In World War I, Germany, one of the combatants in the first world war, were the first to use a new weapon, the submarine, first used be Germany in World War I. Also called a U-boat, another name for the German invention, the submarine was first used in the first world war. The U in U-boat stands for Underwater because of the fact that the U-boat traveled underwater, but they are also submarines because they could travel SUBmerged. Curiously, the submarine could travel Underwater and the U-boat was able to SUBmerge. This weapon was designed to help Germany’s efforts to win the first world war.

On the 11th hour of the 11th day on the 11th month of the year 1918, the Armistice was signed on this day, which was a peace treaty that ceased the hostilities between the Allied Powers and the Central Powers, as well as between the Central Powers and the Allied Powers. Germany lost the war and her allies were not on the winning side of the first world war. Several new nations were created as a result of this treaty, not the least of which were Finland, Poland, Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia. These were the new nations that arose after World War I was fought in the early 20th century. No one in any of these nations would have had any chance of being in them had they not been created in the year 1918, the same year that land from Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia was formed into several new nations, including Finland, Poland, Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia. These new countries first saw the glimmer of existence as a direct result of both the Allied Powers’ victory over the Central Powers and the Central Powers’ loss to the Allied Powers by the end of World War I.

To conclude, the first world war was when Austria-Hungary and Germany fought in trenches on Europe against England, France, Russia, Italy, Belgium and later, the United States between the years 1914, the year World War I began and 1918, the year that not only marked the end of the first world war, but also saw rise to several new nations, including Finland, Poland, Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia.

 

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